Upper-Division Writing Workshops

Workshops for Instructors


The Writing Center offers faculty workshops to support upper-division writing course instructors.

WORKSHOP REQUEST FORM
Note: We require a 2-week advance notice for all requests.

Incorporating low-stakes writing exercises

Low-stakes writing, assignments that have little or no impact on grades, helps students engage more deeply with and develop a stronger understanding of a topic. Because it separates learning from a grade, it allows both students and the instructor to focus on how the class material is being understood without spending lots of time on grading. This workshop will present different types of low-stakes assignments and how they improve students’ writing process.

Participants will learn how to:

Preparing students for peer review

Peer review sessions can be beneficial for both you, the instructor, and for your students. They also risk being a poor use of time, an occasion for bad grammar advice to be perpetuated, or even an opportunity for stereotypes to be reinforced. This workshop will demonstrate how peer review can be reworked as a productive, informative, and transformative activity for instructors, students, and peer editors.

Participants will learn how to:

Note: This workshop can be paired with a class visit. See below.

Teaching writing to English language learners

Students who are English Language Learners (ELLs) pose unique lesson planning and classroom management challenges for instructors. These challenges can be overcome by awareness of this population’s characteristics, scaffolding class material, and prioritizing feedback. This workshop will present considerations and strategies for creating a more inclusive classroom.

Participants will learn how to:

Class Visits


In addition to workshops, we are happy to visit your class and conduct one of the following workshops for your students.

WORKSHOP REQUEST FORM
Note: We require a 2-week advance notice for all requests.

Conducting peer review sessions

“Great Job!” “Awkward.” “Unclear.” If your students have been left unsatisfied by similar feedback from peer review workshops, or you are tired of giving this kind of feedback and want to know how to be a better reviewer, this workshop is a chance to learn. Peer review is a skill that can be learned, and we will practice reading for a purpose to provide specific feedback, evaluating peer input to make effective revision choices, and using a rubric as an evaluation tool in peer review. You’ll leave more confident of how to both give and receive writing feedback.

Participants will learn how to:

Organizing literature reviews

Although a literature review is a standard section of almost all longer papers and scholarly articles, they can vary widely, depending upon one’s field of study. There are a few common, guiding principles, though, which we will explore in this workshop, that will help you write your literature review.

Participants will learn how to:

Incorporating sources & discipline specific citation formats

The requirement for papers to include a certain number of outside sources is often clear to instructors, but a mystery to students. What pieces of source material are useful to our arguments, and how do we incorporate them? How should we manage our sources’ bibliographic information? What is the relationship between citation and academic honesty? This workshop will allow participants to work through their own fields’ expectations and devise more successful strategies for finding, organizing, and incorporating sources in their work. Following this we will examine the discipline-specific formats of both in-text citation and ending documentation, as well as preview a few citation software programs and manuals.

Participants will learn how to:


If you are a faculty member interested in a classroom visit, consultation, or workshop on a subject of writing not listed above, please contact Sue Cross at secross@uci.edu.